Slide 4

Working for a better future and outcomes for our children

Events

From January 2016 to September 2017 the Family-led decision making trial was conducted across four Queensland communities.  This was in response to recommendations in the Queensland Child Protection Commission of Inquiry’s report (Taking Responsibility: A Roadmap for Queensland Child Protection, 2013). 

An external evaluation undertaken by research partners Winangali Pty Ltd and Ipsos Australia found the family led decision making process to be effective for:

SNAICC – National Voice for our children supported the trials as an implementation partner, with a focus on:

  • Developing guidelines and practice resources for the trials in partnership with Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Association
  • training and practice support to trial convenors from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations,
  • supporting local governance groups and
  • supporting collaborative practice between department and convenors at each trial site.

SNAICC's report on the trails provides 24 recommendations for the next steps in implementing family-led decision making in Queensland.  The report also highlights key learnings on the themes of:

  • Cultural authority and leadership of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander convenors, community members and community organisations
  • Support across all decision-making points in the child protection continuum as well as early intervention
  • Adequate resourcing
  • Preparing families for meetings
  • Collaborative practice development between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community organisations and the Department of Child Safety
  • Holistic responses and integration with other family supports
  • Supporting practice excellence.

The roll out of family-led decision making is enabled by the Child Protection Reform Amendment Act 2017 that directs the department to:

  • Incorporate the five elements of the child placement principle into any decisions in relation to an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child/ ren and their families, and
  • Engage an Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander organisation or a person or a group of people, that:
    •  are independent of the Department of Child Safety,
    • have appropriate authority to speak about and on behalf of the child or the child’s family, and
    • can facilitate the process of  decision-making through the family lead decision making process.

Queensland Government is in the process of procuring Family Participation Programs across the state to align with this legislative change.  This will take effect as of 1 November 2018.

SNAICC is partnering with QATSICPP and AbSec’s Registered Training Organisation to develop an intensive, 5-day course on family-led decision making based on learnings from the trials. 

The development of the training program content and activities will be informed by: 

Training is targeted at workers from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled organisations that support families with child safety concerns (at all stages including early intervention) and that have a role in supporting families using a family led decision making process. This includes staff of Family Wellbeing services and the new Family Participation Programs.

Participants will learn principles and best practice approaches to family-led decision-making and will develop skills in working with families and other service providers using this approach, as well as in facilitating family-led decision-making meetings.

The course will be delivered face to face in South-east Qld, Central Qld, North Qld and the Torres Strait Islands during October and November this year. 

Travel costs will be covered to attend training for a limited number of participants per location.

If you have questions or suggestions to make regarding this training, SNAICC would love to hear from you. Contact Eva at eva.ruggiero@snaicc.org.au

QATSICPP is holding the Inaugural Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Child Protection Awards Night on 6 September 2018.  

Where: Rydges South Bank, 9 Glenelg Street, South Brisbane Qld 4101
Arrive and Pre-dinner drinks: 6.00pm
Commencement of event: 6.30pm

There will be 5 award categories. The Award Categories are:

  1. Direct Service Delivery Award:  this award is to recognise an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled child protection worker who has demonstrated best practice in their direct service delivery to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, young people and/or families.

  2. Cultural Leadership:  this award is to recognise an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled child protection worker who has demonstrated outstanding cultural leadership and mentoring within the workplace and/or community.

  3. Youth Advocacy:  this award is to recognise an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled child protection worker who has demonstrated best outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people through strong advocacy skills.

  4. Innovation within the Sector:  this award is to recognise an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled child protection worker who has demonstrated innovation within the sector to achieve best outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people.  

  5. Family: This award is to recognise families who are doing an amazing job of caring for and protecting their children.

To purchase tickets for the event HERE

RSVP by COB 24 August 2018.

As we move forward with embedding and implementing QATSICPP Practice Standards and supervision framework. QATSICPP encourages those that have participated in the practice standards workshops and supervision framework training to being a process of reflection, individually or in your teams (using the thought bubbles/ take home messages that you jotted down at the end of each module), about your experiences with embedding or applying the practice standards and supervision framework in your work/ practice.

The following survey, QATSICPP Practice Standards, Supervision Framework & Me, may assist you with these reflections and discussions. By completing this survey, you will provide us with valuable information about your experiences and ways we can better support the sector with embedding and applying the practice standards and supervision framework in practice.

The survey will take about 10minutes to complete:

TAKE THE SURVEY

Snap Shot of Practice Standards workshops and Supervision Framework training

Number of participants = 300

  • 236 participants completed standard 1 (Module 1); Engaging the Child and Family
  • 236 completed standard 2, (module 2); Identifying the storyline
  • 230 completed standard 3, (module 3); Changing the storyline
  • 220 completed standard 4 (module 4); Establishing a new storyline and
  • 215 completing the supervision framework training.

Number of participating services = 23 (21 FWBS, 1 Recognised Entity, 1 mainstream NGO)

Number of workers by profession (not all participants reported their position title)

  • Support worker = 96
  • Case worker = 33
  • Coordinators = 25
  • Team Leaders = 13
  • Managers = 17
  • Practitioners = 20
  • Executive = 5

Participants testimonies

  • “No, I found the delivery to be culturally appropriate which is great. Having facilitators with knowledge of your work is an advantage”.
  • “Keep doing what your doing”
  • “Appreciate that you are delivering through yarning real stories”
  • “we’ve done a lot around this, we need to be challenged more”
  • “thank you for the new knowledge learnt. The content was informative”
  • “more time to role play workers, supervisors”
  • “follow up sessions so it sinks in”
  • “have community members tell their story as part of the workshops/ training”
  • “diagrams be more detailed, as I found it difficult to understand – concept map”
  • “maybe use or ask staff to use examples of their practice in engaging families”

 

Participants from the Gidgee Healing Family Wellbeing Services – May 2018

Picture6

Participants from the Brisbane Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Service and Yulu-Burri-Ba Aboriginal Corporation for Community Health, Family Wellbeing Service – April 2018 

Picture7

Workshop Training Opportunities

Galang Education & Training

Gallang Education and Training (RTO#40564) are conducting training for community & health workers in the CHC43315 Cert IV in Mental Health (Government funded). This course is delivered over 12 months, 6 one week blocks, every 2 months.

They also offer the CHC51015 Diploma of Counselling training delivered over 14 months with 8 face to face blocks.

Your workers/employees may be interested in Upskilling instead of doing a full qualification. Gallang now offer the Healing Accredited Short course that runs for 4 Blocks covering 5 Units of Competencies.

Galang Education and Training delivers courses Queensland wide. Their qualifications are Nationally recognised, gaining pathways to higher qualifications. All the Units of Competencies are accredited and you may be entitled to a straight Credit Transfers in other qualifications if you pursue further studies.

Please contact our training team on (07) 3899-5041 for further information.

SNAICC – National Voice for our Children

SNAICC also offer education and training workshops for the sector. Some are:

  • Stronger Safer Together
  • Through Young Black Eyes
  • Safe for community
  • Safe for kids
  • Safe for Women
  • Safe and Healhty Men
  • Working and Walking Together
  • Opening Doors to genuine partnerships
  • Recognising and responding to Trauma
  • Tracks to Healing

Please contact SNAICC on phone: 03 9489 8099 or visit their website: http://www.snaicc.org.au/sector-development/

Services are encouraged to share and post on QATSICPP Facebook page any training opportunities or scholarships or to forward onto members of the QATSICPP team for distribution and/or promotion.

National Workforce Centre for Child Mental Health
Trauma and the child

This course explores a trauma-informed approach to understanding the prevalence of trauma, and its impacts on the child and families. It briefly explores the implications of this approach to caring for, or working with, young people. It does not explore trauma- specific therapies. 

It is estimated that the course will take you three – four hours to complete (including watching videos and completing assessments). However, you can complete the course in several sessions at your own pace. The last page you visit will be bookmarked so that you can jump straight back to where you left off – whenever it suits you, 24/7.

To participate in any of their elearning courses, please click on the following link and register. https://emergingminds.com.au/training/

Insight Webinars – Alcohol and other drug training and workforce development

May 30 - The Queensland Drug and Alcohol Court
This seminar will provide insight into the model for the re-instated program, an also explore the reasons and principles regarding what makes diversionary courts an effective intervention and resource.

June 6 – Working with people with personality disorders
This presentation will focus upon the challenges of working with clients with personality disorders, offering practical strategies for engagement, management and treatment.

To participate in any of Insights workshops and webinars, please visit their website to register. https://insight.qld.edu.au/training

Health Infonet: https://healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/key-resources/courses/

For further information on Practice Standards workshop and/ or supervision framework training and/ or further professional development, please contact Sidney Williams, 0477 701 257 or email: sidneywilliams@qatsicpp.com.au.

Dear SNAICC members and supporters,

SNAICC is delighted to announce the theme for National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children's Day for 2018 is SNAICC – Celebrating Our Children for 30 Years.

Our children are the youngest people from the longest living culture in the world, with rich traditions, lore and customs that have been passed down from generation to generation. Our children are growing up strong with connection to family, community and country. Our children are the centre of our families and the heart of our communities. They are our future and the carriers of our story.

This year, we invite communities to take a walk down memory lane, as we revisit some of the highlights of the last 30 years. We look back on the empowering protest movements instigated by community that had led to the establishment of the first Children’s Day on 4 August 1988. We look back at all of the amazing moments we’ve shared with our children over the years, and how we’re watching them grow into leaders. We look back to see what we’ve achieved and decide where we want to go from here to create a better future for our children. If you have celebrated Children’s Day at any time during the past 30 years, we would love to hear from you.

Please keep an eye out for the latest Children’s Day news on our website. There you can download your Celebration Kit 2018, order your FREE Children’s Day poster, buy your Children’s Day 2018 resource bags and register your event www.aboriginalchildrensday.com.au.

Maylene Slater-Burns
Children's Day Coordinator
maylene.slater-burns@snaicc.org.au

CREATE Foundation recently travelled across Queensland to speak with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander young people (with a care experience) to hear about their experiences of feeling connected to culture whilst in care.

We spoke to young people aged 12-25 as part of a project called ‘First Nation Voices’. After this, CREATE then invited young people who participated in the consultations to come to Brisbane in April to take part in our advocacy and Leadership training ‘Speak Up.’ CREATE had the privilege of partnering with QATSICPP for ‘Speak Up’ where young people explored culture, advocacy, leadership, art, yarning together and explored building a better life for children and young people in care.

QATSICPP and CREATE Speak Up Program

These deadly young people also took part in a workshop with Actor/ Comedian Steven Oliver. It was a day of sharing, art and collaborating to come up with a declaration for Aboriginal and/ or Torres Strait Islander Young people in care and their experiences. We are excited to see the future opportunities for the young people that took part in this. Already two young people from the workshop have spoken at Departmental Meetings, sharing parts of their stories and how culture was a crucial part of the journey.

CREATE First Nation Voices

Last year was a big year for team QATSICPP and member organisations with the delivery of quality education and training focusing on QATSICPP Practice Standards and Supervision Framework.

In total, 252 participants attended from 13 family wellbeing services, 1 Recognised Entity and 1 mainstream NGO. Of the 252 participants:

  • 230 participants completed standard 1 (Module 1); Engaging the Child and Family
  • 230 completed standard 2, (module 2); Identifying the storyline
  • 224 completed standard 3, (module 3); Changing the storyline
  • 214 completed standard 4 (module 4); Establishing a new storyline and
  • 207 completing the supervision framework training.

The delivery of the standards and framework training has been well received by those who participated. We conducted a pre-and post-evaluation, prior to the start of each module and after each module with participants reporting a shift from fairly low to fairly high in their knowledge, understanding and confidence in applying the standards and framework in practice. Overall, participants rated the content and delivery of the standards workshop and supervision training between fairly high to very high.

As we continue to refine and improve on the content and delivery of the standards and framework, we value the feedback and ideas provided by those that participated and endeavour to incorporate these into future workshops and training.

As 2018 rolls on, we will see the continuation of the Practice Standards workshops and supervision framework training for family wellbeing sites in Brisbane (Brisbane ATSICHS, Kurbingui, Murri School) and across the Cape and the Torres Strait. This will include 'catch-up' workshops and training for those that couldn't attend the practice standards modules and/ or supervision framework training, as well as opportunities for targeted training and education for the sector.

Practice Standards and Supervision Framework Testimonies provided by participants:

"the standards set out how we pretty much work anyways. It's good to see it has been captured and is how a learning tool for the new and younger generations that step in our shoes, roles"
"solid summary of learning and linking ideas and examples back to standards"
"enjoyed the group work and the sharing of ideas"
"enjoyed the use of different activities to cover the content"
"All the activities were great and although some content was genetic it was inspiring to see how this model of supervision fits so well with the practice standards. We can only aspire to achieve this degree of integration with our mainstream practice and processes"

Upcoming Training Opportunities

Trauma Informed Short Course

The Healing Foundation in partnership Gallang Place Education and Training (https://www.gallang.qld.edu.au) will be offering a trauma informed short course this year.

The short course comprises 5 unit of competencies:

  • develop a healing framework for SEWB;
  • promote Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander cultural safety;
  • recognise and respond to crisis situations;
  • work effectively in trauma informed care; and
  • work within a narrative approach.

For more information contact Gallang Place Education and Training on 07 3899 5041.

Services are encouraged to share and post on QATSICPP Facebook page any training opportunities or scholarships or to forward onto members of the QATSICPP team for distribution and/or promotion.

Scholarships Opportunities

https://www.communitysectorbanking.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Indigenous-Scholarship-Program-factsheet.pdf
https://www.indigenousscholarships.com.au/#/nav/landing-page
https://www.qut.edu.au/study/fees-and-scholarships/scholarships/getting-started-indigenous-scholarship
https://www.usc.edu.au/learn/what-will-i-pay/scholarships/indigenous-and-australian-south-sea-islander-students/commonwealth-scholarships-for-indigenous-students
http://iaha.com.au/allied-health-careers/scholarships/
https://www.scu.edu.au/scholarships/scholarships-for-indigenous-australian-students/
https://www2.griffith.edu.au/scholarships

For further information on Practice Standards workshop and/ or supervision framework training and/ or further professional development, please contact Sidney Williams, 0477 701 257 or email: sidneywilliams@qatsicpp.com.au.

Standard 1: what was the most important thing you learnt from this module about engaging children, families and communities?

Wordmap 1

Standard 2: What was the most important thing you learnt from this module about identifying the storyline?

Wordmap 2

Standard 3: What was the most important thing you learnt from this module about changing the storyline?

Wordmap 3

Standard 4: What was the most important thing you learnt from this module about establishing the storyline?

Wordmap 4

Supervision Framework: What was the most important thing you learnt from this training?

Wordmap 5

Participants from the Nhulundu Family Wellbeing Service, December 2017

Nhulundu Family Wellbeing Service

The Aboriginal Child, Family and Community Care State Secretariat (AbSec) hosted their biennial conference from the 22nd to the 24th of November 2017 at beautiful Coffs Harbour.

The first day of the conference focussed on the Sector. Sidney Williams, Training and Education Coordinator, kicked off the QATSICPP team presentations by speaking about the evaluation findings from the rollout of the QATSICPP Practice Standards workshop and Supervision Framework training. He did this through using snippets from both training modules. Delegates were engaged throughout Sidney's presentation.

After lunch, I had the opportunity to speak to the delegates about how I have put the Practice Standards into practice in my own role as Senior Practice Leader at QATSICPP. I highlighted the work to date of the Community of Practice and the awesome opportunity I have had delivering external supervision to the Practice Leads of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Wellbeing Services throughout Queensland.

The second and third day focussed on the Worker. A keynote presentation by Jocelyn Formsma and Caleb Turner, both from the Moose Cree First Nation in Northern Ontario, started the day off by getting us all thinking. Jocelyn and Caleb helped to reinforce the importance of not forgetting that our daily work aligns with the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, The Convention on the Rights of the Child and Active Efforts. My take-away was the importance of not forgetting the voice of children and young people and including them in decision making!

After morning tea, Nadia Currie, Operations Manager, provided an overview of the work that her and Lenny Dahlen, Member Engagement and Participation Coordinator, undertook to redefine Aboriginal Community Control for the Aboriginal Community Controlled Child Protection sector in Queensland. There was a lot of interest and questions in relation to the findings of this project and the impending release of the report.

On day three, Nadia and I presented about Knowledge Circles and the process that we undertake when engaging with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities throughout Queensland. We highlighted that the importance of this process is involving real voice and real participation otherwise we are doing an injustice to participants in these Knowledge Circles if this does not occur.

We enjoyed hearing from the other speakers and the opportunity to network with the Child Protection sector in New South Wales.

We would like to thank Tim Ireland and the team at AbSec for allowing us the opportunity to both present and participate in the conference.

By Candice Butler, Senior Practice Leader

Australian Early Development Census National Conference 
Call for abstracts opens 1 November 2017. More

15th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference
What Matters Most to Families in the 21st Century?
Call for abstracts now open. More

2018 Early Childhood Conference
Be the Difference for Children and Families
Call for abstracts now open. More

Doing School DifferentlyYouth+ and Berry Street Childhood Institute
Call for abstracts now open. More

Re-Imagining Childhood
Adelaide: 6-8 November 2017
Government of South Australia: More

6th Annual NHMRC Symposium on Research Translation
Brisbane: 14-15 November
NHMRC & Lowitja Institute: More

National Missing Persons Conference
Sydney: 15-16 November. More

Connections for Life: National Permanency Conference
Sydney: 16-17 November
Adopt Change. More

FRSA National Conference 2017Connecting the Dots: Creating wellbeing for all
Early bird registration closing 30 September
Melbourne: 22-24 November. More

The Infant, the State, Ethics and the Law
Australian Association for Infant Mental Health National Conference
Melbourne: 23-26 November. More

Women in Leadership Summit 2017
Sydney. 24-27 October: More

STOP Domestic Violence Conference
Melbourne: 4-6 December. More

Australian and New Zealand Addiction Conference
Gold Coast: 28-30 May 2018. More

25th Biennial Meeting of the International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development
Gold Coast, QLD: 15-19 July 2018.
Abstract submissions close 30 September 2017

ISPCAN XXII International Congress on Child Abuse and Neglect
Prague, Czech Republic. 2-5 September 2018
Abstract submissions open 1 December 2017: More

  • Child Protection Environment

    53.7%

    of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were placed with a kinship or Indigenous carer.
  • Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak

    69,200

    There are 69,200 Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander children / young people in Queensland.