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Working for a better future and outcomes for our children

Post-Conference Tour – 16-17 June 2017

The Post-Conference Tour was held from the 16th to the 17th of June 2017.

One of the first stops that we made was at a town called Masi which was the hometown of the conference coordinator, Christina Hætta. The government wanted to build a dam that would result in the town being flooded with water. The Sami people fought against this happening and the second picture on the left depicts their fight. It demonstrated to me the importance of people power and standing up for our land.

In Kautokeino, we had the opportunity to visit the Sami University (pictured in the top left). The three main departments are: Department of Linguistics; Department of Social Sciences; and, Department of Duodji (traditional Sami handicraft) and Teacher Education. FYI: they are super keen to form partnerships with Australia!

One of my highlights was visiting the Sami Parliament of Norway (the large building in the middle). The Sami Parliament was first convened in 1989. They work under the Sami Act and are a representative body for the Sami people.

I had the opportunity to visit a traditional sea Sami village as well as the northern most part of Europe – Northcape.

So, can anyone guess what’s in the photo on the top right? It’s a seagull egg and dried Moose heart. Unfortunately, I didn’t have an opportunity to taste either however I heard from my fellow tour buddies that the egg just tasted like a normal egg and the Moose heart was definitely different!

Overall, the Post-Conference Tour was a great way to hear more about the history of the Sami people and also to speak informally with the conference delegates.

Article by Candice Butler

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